Plan to Perform and Grow

Leadership teams that are on track to reach their potential to perform and grow have:

  • A written, board-approved financial plan that shows revenue, direct costs, gross margin, indirect costs by function (e.g., marketing, sales, HR, R&D, etc.), and operating profit (i.e., EBITDA),  by month and quarter for the year. Approved financial plans tend to have the following characteristics:
    • Smooth (or otherwise rational) ramp-up (or down) of revenue and costs from the prior year closing month and quarter.
    • Generally upward-trending scale (i.e., ever bigger and better).
    • A 75% chance of being achieved by the in-place team with roughly 2/3 of planned revenue either booked or highly-probable (B&HP) and a highly-qualified pipeline of prospective, current year, revenue equal to three times the gap between B&HP and Plan (and not all in the last quarter or two!).
    • Identified upside-downside potential with mitigation strategies on the downside and what will be done to take full advantage of any upside.
    • Assumptions and triggers that explain what has to happen for planned results to occur and for planned expenses to be made.
  • An operating plan that covers:
    • Whose problem the organization solves, how it solves it, and how well compared to peers, prior years and plans.
    • A labor plan including sourcing, developing, managing, and deploying personnel consistent with the financial plan.
    • A market description and market development plan.
    • A product (or equivalent) development road-map.
    • Do-Sell-Grow systems of operations and governance.
    • Three-to-seven initiatives to improve performance and drive growth; including who will lead each and the associated budget, work-plan, targeted results, metrics of performance, and communications plan.
  • A leadership team of from 3 to 7 who:
    • Are clear about who the team counts on for what (i.e., leadership roles and performance goals).
    • Are driven to achieve or exceed plan by an incentive program.
    • Routinely share with each other what is working and what each can do to improve.
  • track record of consistently achieving planned performance.

LEADERSHIP TEAM SELF-ASSESSMENT

Take just one-minute to fill out the self-assessment below (best done on your computer instead of your phone) to see if you, your team, and your organization are on track. The assessment is self-scoring and includes an answer key. You can also use the form to have us to get in touch to share our thoughts on the best answers and on how your team stacks up, at no cost or obligation.

REMEMBER: We never share your data.

SEE ALSO

Executive Incentive Compensation Programs

Solution Development Framework

Account Development

Sample Operating Framework

Revenue Projections

Crisis Prep

You smell smoke. Then come flames! You run into the front yard and turn to look at your home with fear and dread. Now imagine your local, rookie fireman appears on the scene to fight your fire having only ever trained online with no real field-simulation experience!

Firemen train by fighting real fires in a controlled environment to learn how to use the equipment and how to make repairs on the fly when gear malfunctions, such as when a hydrant fails to turn-on as expected. Only experience with a real fire teaches the teamwork needed to work fast and handle unexpected problems.

Is this crisis real or staged?

Many organizations have written a crisis management plan and secured approvals all the way up to the C-Suite, but have never tested the plan in real circumstances to know how it works. Plans that have not been “pressure-tested” in a realistic, simulated situation risk that the team will not work well together and face higher odds of financial and reputational damage, or worse, when the inevitable crisis hits.

Continue reading Crisis Prep

Federal Sales

The best federal sales executives find that just three things lead to more wins than losses:

  • Excellent client relationship.
  • A number one or two ranked technical proposal.
  • A price within 2-3% of the lowest bidder.

A well thought out, implementable selling system should assure these three tenets are in place. That is what it takes to achieve consistent, scalable, organic growth in the government marketplace.

Selling to government is easy… most companies make it hard.

Approach

Form a Federal Sales Steering Committee, chaired by the organization leader and staffed with executives who lead relevant corporate functional areas (such as sales, delivery, product development, contracts, human resources, and finance) to conduct an internal assessment process. The Assessment Phase should take about 30-days to complete.

Retain the support of an outside, experienced, highly successful federal sales executive to guide the committee through the assessment and implementation of recommendations. Continue reading Federal Sales

CEO Role

Every organization has, or needs, a leader. And it is true that the power of one committed, clear person can make all the difference in the world. But no one individual, even the greatest leader, does anything of much significance alone.

 *Excerpted From: Get Aligned Section of Manage to Lead, Seven Truths to Help You Change the World page 49, exhibit 36.
CEO Responsibilities from the book “Manage to Lead

The best leaders know that it is not all about them. It is about their team. Consequently, one of a CEO’s most important jobs (see highlighted text at left) is to ensure that every team member knows what the leader and team expects from her/him to achieve planned results.

How to Empower Executive Teams

A good way for executives to know what team members need from them is to ask each to share views on their own, and on each others’, individual strengths, contributions, growth, and opportunities for development. Continue reading CEO Role

Leader Exit

At an as yet unspecified time in the near future, the revered leader of a high-functioning team must exit, due to age, health, opportunity, or some other compelling reason.

The way the team sees it, the exiting leader must bring in a new leader or anoint someone from within, though no team member is clearly the one to take the reins in the eyes of the others. The team is anxious and wants to know what steps will be taken when to secure a new leader. Continue reading Leader Exit

Intelligent Strategies. Successful Ventures.