Tag Archives: job search

Quitting Benefits

Most people have no idea to what they are entitled when and if they quit their job. AboutUnemployment.org demystifies the rules relating to benefit entitlement upon employee-initiated termination in their article: Can You Collect Unemployment If You Quit?.  

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Click the photo for a short clip that will get you in the mood to quit.

Good cause

If you are laid off or made redundant, you are eligible for unemployment benefits. In the majority of cases, you are also entitled to benefits if you were fired, as long as it was not for gross misconduct. But when you quit your job, eligibility hinges on whether or not there was good cause. Continue reading Quitting Benefits

What to do when the hiring manager says: “Name your terms!”

“What will it take to hire you?” These words may be music to your ears, but how you respond makes a big difference. Take your time, collect your thoughts, and follow these seven tips to make the most of the opportunity:

  • Decide you want the job. Make sure you like what the organization does and that the people you would work with give you energy and get energy from you. If you do not like and want the work, or if you do not look forward to spending time with the people every day, a job at any pay will turn into a grind. If not, politely let them know and move on…it is a waste of their time and yours to do otherwise. If you want the job ask for a day or two to discuss it with advisers before getting back to them.
  • Know your worth. Research the web and ask around to learn the current market value for your basket of skills. If you think you might undersell yourself, do some digging to arm yourself with up-to-date information and boost your confidence. On the other hand, be honest with yourself to avoid an inflated sense of worth. Make sure your expectations are reasonable given your compensation history and relative to those with comparable scope and scale of responsibility, experience, and results in your location. Do not go just by job title. For example, a first-time manager of a six-person team is not worth the same compensation as a 15-year veteran who has successfully led a 30-person team over multiple years, even though both are called Project Managers.

Continue reading What to do when the hiring manager says: “Name your terms!”

Three Tips for Early Stage Professionals Seeking Their Next Job

Your first job out of school is NOT a life sentence.  The best move might be to take what you have learned so far and step out to complement it with a whole new set of experiences  before deciding to settle-in somewhere for the long haul.  

While it can seem daunting, if you remember that it is a job to find a job, read all the posts in the Job Search category of this site, and follow these three Tips for Early Stage Professionals, the results may well be worth it:

  • Put your education at the bottom of your resume once you have any work experience. Education is most important only in getting your first job out of school.  From then on it is about what you have done in previous jobs that support and make a case for what you say you want to do next.

Continue reading Three Tips for Early Stage Professionals Seeking Their Next Job

How to Find a Job

It is a job to find a job…and most do not do it well; in part because there is little time to find a new one while employed and, when unemployed, a sense of despondence, depression, or desperation may make it hard to perform at peak levels. Three steps can turn the average job seeker into their own search executive in charge of a stress-free campaign that is guaranteed to find a job and to grow as a professional from the experience. Continue reading How to Find a Job