Category Archives: Manage to Lead

Managed to Lead posts are organized into the categories below and are about what can be managed in order to be a better leader. There is a category for each of seven actions motivated by seven simple truths about leaders and organizations which, if followed, can help you change the world.

Board Power! A Guide to Improve Board Performance

CEOs often fall into the trap of orchestrating meetings with their Board of Directors to:

  • Show how great they are and how well things are going (whether they really are or not!).

  • Avoid leaving the meeting with more to do than when it started.

A great deal of value can be derived from working with a board, but it takes a concerted effort to build, cultivate, prepare for, and work with individual board members and the board as a whole for that potential to be realized. Efforts to build a high-performing board are well-spent.

Continue reading Board Power! A Guide to Improve Board Performance

What makes an exceptional WWW

The purpose of a business is to solve a problem for a customer…which drives every core leadership team to align on its WWW: that is, on WHAT their organization provides, WHO decides to buy their service or product, and WHY the buyer chooses them to buy it from.

With team alignment leaders can work to improve their WWW to set direction, perform better, and grow faster. To so do, it helps to know what distinguishes a good WWW from a great one, and what it takes to have one that is exceptional.

Continue reading What makes an exceptional WWW

How to Run Operating Meetings

An CEO Manage to Lead participant put it this way:

“It’s easy to make great progress when you aren’t doing much in the first place”

when commenting on the lift in performance experienced after tweaking the approach to running his organization’s weekly Operating Meeting.

The motivation was to stop wasting countless hours discussing philosophical and theoretical matters that had little-to-nothing to do with operations and that kept them from getting important work done in their operating meeting up to that point.

The point of his Haiku-like phrase is that it is not hard to run an organization better…but you do have to work at it.

Every meeting needs to be thought through to get clear why it is being held, what it is to produce, how it will be accomplished, and what outcomes are to be generated (see: How to Run a Great Meeting).

A good approach for Operating Meetings is for the organization’s leader (e.g., CEO, unit leader, initiative leader, project manager, etc.) to have each functional leader (e.g., head of engineering, head of marketing, etc.) present in literally just a few minutes:

3 Tips and Four C’s to Raise a leader’s Communication game

Leaders who practice conscious, courteous, courageous, culturally sensitive language arts rise to the top. It is human nature to follow those who lead by example, inspire us, and who appear confident and poised.

Such traits are no accident. The best leaders manage themselves to convey a dynamic energy, stage presence, and powerful communications. You only have a few seconds to make a first impression. What impression do you choose to make?

Think of it like this: you walk in confidently, looking pulled together, and then open your mouth to speak. Does what comes out match the visual cues received from looking at you? That is, do you sound as good as you look?

Your voice speaks volumes about your confidence level, your education, socioeconomic stature, and your roots. And your voice can be managed to help you be a more effective leader.

Continue reading 3 Tips and Four C’s to Raise a leader’s Communication game

4 Steps to Tap Into the Power of The Learning Community

Have you ever noticed how helpful it is to test-run your messaging by others you know and trust will provide honest helpful advice and suggestions?

Have you ever been asked to provide a reaction and found it easy to take a few minutes to listen, think, develop a point of view, and then share it?

Such is the power of a like-minded crowd. There is plenty of both need and competent capacity to provide value.

At any given moment, of the hundreds of people who have developed, taught, learned, and used IntelliVen content, a few have the time and inclination to help a compatriot in need. Many of you have encouraged us to further facilitate such exchanges and that is exactly what we aim to do with the IntelliVen Learning Community (ILC).

There is now a featured post at the top of the IntelliVen LinkedIn Company Page called Ask the Learning Community. Every Friday we will post a question or situation submitted by an ILC member. You are invited to enter a comment to share your reaction, suggestions, experience, wisdom, and/or resources. 

This post explains the mechanics you need to know to participate. Don’t hesitate to jump in and give it a try. As always, your feedback and suggestions are most welcome. Continue reading 4 Steps to Tap Into the Power of The Learning Community