Tag Archives: leadership development

How Top CEOs Manage Their Time

Time Management for Leaders and Aspiring Leaders

After reviewing the draft news release announcing my latest promotion (many years back) and offering her congratulations, our press agent exclaimed with some dismay that: “…now you’ll have even LESS time than ever!”

I remember remarking smartly in reply that she was wrong, and that I still had just as much time as I’d always had. In fact, I had the same amount of time each day that both Da Vinci and Einstein had, and that my job, same as ever, was to make the most of it! Continue reading How Top CEOs Manage Their Time

Your Case is the Course

Any organization is more likely to reach its potential to perform and grow when its leaders are clear about their organization today, where it is headed next and why, and when they know how it will get thereStrategic Leadership: Manage to Lead Using the Seven Truths introduces a straightforward yet rigorous way to describe and assess any organization as it exists and as its leaders would like it next to be considering external and internal threats and opportunities.

Continue reading Your Case is the Course

How a new skill becomes core to leadership.

A new competence integrates into leadership skill sets in a three-stage sequence. It was true for Information Technology (IT) over the past 60 years and it is proving true again for Organization Development (OD).  (Excerpted from the Get Loose Chapter of Manage to Lead: Seven Truths to Help You Change The World)

A new competence integrates into an organization in a three-stage sequence:

Stage 1: New competence provided by a source outside the organization.

Stage 2: New competence brought inside the organization as staff-support.

Stage 3: New competence becomes a pervasive skill across the organization.

odimage03-flowchart

Example: Information Technology (IT)

Information Technology competence was non-existent in organizations before World War II. After the war leaders drew on outside experts and eventually staffed internal IT departments. Only in the past few decades have organization leaders been defined by their IT competence.

odimage02-stages
Click to see evolution of IT competence in organizations over time.

Continue reading How a new skill becomes core to leadership.

How to develop leaders, teams, and organizations that perform to their potential.

If you’ve been in charge for a while and it feels like performance and growth are not where you want them to be, you probably know that you are likely headed in the wrong direction.

Every leader, team, and organization eventually hits an inflection point. There IS a solution.

The first step is to take stock of how things are going, why things need to change, and how they would be if things were going well.

A management offsite is an excellent way to engage the top team along these lines. However, to prepare for and facilitate a high-powered executive offsite takes careful planning, data collection, analysis, and design effort.

Approach

Most leaders find it difficult to adequately prepare—assuming they even know how—for their offsite. Further, it is nearly impossible for a leader to facilitate and participate in, let alone also lead, their own offsite. A better strategy is to hire experts who use proven approaches, tools, and methods to prepare and facilitate.

Continue reading How to develop leaders, teams, and organizations that perform to their potential.

How a top team spent a little time and took a big step to the next stage of growth.

Skills by stageBackground

Leaders of fast growing, early-stage organizations operate at a fast pace. Often the last thing there is time to do is assess the top team’s performance to determine how to prepare them for the next stage of growth.

Most team members know each other pretty well. They have a good idea what each other is good at, has contributed, how they have grown, and what each should focus on next for success. However, team members rarely have the time, energy, training, or nerve to share what they know in a forthright, supportive conversation with one another.

Yet there are serious consequences to not providing feedback when it is needed most. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “How To Tell If You Are a Jerk in the Office” (C-Suite Strategies, Journal Report, Feb 23, 2015), for example, highlights the importance of confidential feedback for executives. Not only are leaders and co-workers affected adversely by dysfunctional behavior but business performance and customer service can be damaged, often permanently, if poor behavior continues.

IntelliVen, a San Francisco-based organization improvement firm, uses a proprietary approach to help leaders and their top teams address top executive feedback head-on. Early this year, for example, IntelliVen worked with a rapidly evolving, $10M financial analytics firm serving Freddie Mac, US Treasury, and Capital One among other leading US financial institutions. The IntelliVen approach was used to assess the top team of senior executives relative to norms for successful organizations at a similar stage of evolution and to identify individual and team opportunities for learning.

Continue reading How a top team spent a little time and took a big step to the next stage of growth.