Tag Archives: organization development

How Top CEOs Manage Their Time

Time Management for Leaders and Aspiring Leaders

After reviewing the draft news release announcing my latest promotion (many years back) and offering her congratulations, our press agent exclaimed with some dismay that: “…now you’ll have even LESS time than ever!”

I remember remarking smartly in reply that she was wrong, and that I still had just as much time as I’d always had. In fact, I had the same amount of time each day that both Da Vinci and Einstein had, and that my job, same as ever, was to make the most of it! Continue reading How Top CEOs Manage Their Time

Change Alone is Not Enough

Strategic Leadership is to change your organization the way you want. You don’t just want change, though, because change means different, not necessarily better.

We could say develop, which implies better, but towards what end? More specifically we want to improve but in what ways? What we want is to improve how well we do what we do, or performance, and how much of it we do, or growth.

In the end, a leader’s aim is almost always to perform better and grow faster. And that’s what the IntelliVen Leadership Immersion Program is about. We give you the power to change your organization so that it performs better and grows faster. Continue reading Change Alone is Not Enough

How a new skill becomes core to leadership.

A new competence integrates into leadership skill sets in a three-stage sequence. It was true for Information Technology (IT) over the past 60 years and it is proving true again for Organization Development (OD).  (Excerpted from the Get Loose Chapter of Manage to Lead: Seven Truths to Help You Change The World)

A new competence integrates into an organization in a three-stage sequence:

Stage 1: New competence provided by a source outside the organization.

Stage 2: New competence brought inside the organization as staff-support.

Stage 3: New competence becomes a pervasive skill across the organization.

odimage03-flowchart

Example: Information Technology (IT)

Information Technology competence was non-existent in organizations before World War II. After the war leaders drew on outside experts and eventually staffed internal IT departments. Only in the past few decades have organization leaders been defined by their IT competence.

odimage02-stages
Click to see evolution of IT competence in organizations over time.

Continue reading How a new skill becomes core to leadership.

How to Drive Elite C-Suite Performance

In a traditional performance evaluation, someone is assigned to compile and review with each executive a summary of her/his strengths, contributions, growth, and opportunities for improvement. The traditional process has many weaknesses which are summarized in this article recently published by Flevy.com, such as:

  • Compiling a quality performance assessment is difficult; consequently it often gets put off to be done at the last minute but it also takes time to do a good job and time runs out.
  • Assessment content tends to be arbitrary based on ability, skills, and perspective of the reviewer and may not represent the best thinking or interests of the team.
  • Reviewers tend to avoid raising and dealing with tough matters that should be addressed aggressively because it is uncomfortable and they are not trained or motivated to do otherwise.

Continue reading How to Drive Elite C-Suite Performance

How a top team spent a little time and took a big step to the next stage of growth.

Skills by stageBackground

Leaders of fast growing, early-stage organizations operate at a fast pace. Often the last thing there is time to do is assess the top team’s performance to determine how to prepare them for the next stage of growth.

Most team members know each other pretty well. They have a good idea what each other is good at, has contributed, how they have grown, and what each should focus on next for success. However, team members rarely have the time, energy, training, or nerve to share what they know in a forthright, supportive conversation with one another.

Yet there are serious consequences to not providing feedback when it is needed most. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “How To Tell If You Are a Jerk in the Office” (C-Suite Strategies, Journal Report, Feb 23, 2015), for example, highlights the importance of confidential feedback for executives. Not only are leaders and co-workers affected adversely by dysfunctional behavior but business performance and customer service can be damaged, often permanently, if poor behavior continues.

IntelliVen, a San Francisco-based organization improvement firm, uses a proprietary approach to help leaders and their top teams address top executive feedback head-on. Early this year, for example, IntelliVen worked with a rapidly evolving, $10M financial analytics firm serving Freddie Mac, US Treasury, and Capital One among other leading US financial institutions. The IntelliVen approach was used to assess the top team of senior executives relative to norms for successful organizations at a similar stage of evolution and to identify individual and team opportunities for learning.

Continue reading How a top team spent a little time and took a big step to the next stage of growth.